…s answer.– LatePostPacky here. I am a professional tech newsletter writer. I’ve written almost 20,000 words about Chinese giants Tencent and Alibaba. I am an Internet people. And I’d never heard of Shein either.To be fair, though, no one really has. When I asked Rui Ma, an investor…

…this seems gendered

…o it does and does not sell to. Shein describes itself as an “international B2C fast fashion e-commerce platform” with business in more than 220 countries and regions around the world. Nothing Matthew could find on their official website, app or social media accounts references the company’s Chinese origins. In fact, the company is so serious about hiding its Chinese roots that it voluntarily claimed to be from New Jersey. Previously, the About page of Shein’s official website said the company began as “a small group of passionate fashion loving individuals in North Brunswick, New Jersey.” This has since been removed. a.image2.image-link.i…

nothing less suspicious than a mysterious company being based in Jersey!

…ence to Guangzhou or Hong Kong. The company’s logo, branding and products are indistinguishable in their professionalism and quality from global industry peers. Thus far, it’s worked. American …

Dubious. I get a different ambient impression; they’re above “anonymous instagram dropshipper” but not by much

…t it was a smart launching pad. Believe it or not, wedding dresses were the first killer category for Chinese ecommerce firms exporting direct to markets like America. These were the early days of Chi…

Again, please believe me that many women around wedding-dress shopping age knew this.

Can you call it a mystery or surprise when consumers are aware and it’s analysts who aren’t?

…ted to form around the company. By 2015, the newly rebranded SheIn, moved to Panyu in Guangzhou. Panyu is to clothes manufacturing what Shenzhen is to electronics (i.e. ground zero, global best-in-class supply-chain ecosystem). All of Shein’s suppliers moved with it. It’s not hard to understand why.Shein had built a reputation for doing something completely revolutionary and unheard of in China’s apparel industry—they actually paid people on time. a.image2.image-link.i…

This is a fascinating detail.

…lying them to the global market. Everyone knows that China is good at manufacturing. That’s been true for decades. What’s changed is that over the past five years, Chinese companies have caught up, and in some cases surpassed, the rest of the world in its understanding of mobile ecommerce consumer experience. That’s Shein’s story in a nutshe…

And specifically how that consumer experience needs to look different for global customers!

…t scour competitors’ sites, and Shein understands what clothes consumers want now better than anyone with the possible exception of Amazon. Shein feeds that data to its mas…

This feels overly kind to Amazon (she says unofficially in her unofficial capacity as a young woman who’s tried to clothes shop on Amazon)

…ll-positioned when we get there. Before that sci-fi future, while consumers are still buying online and having things made and shipped to them, the logical interim conclusion is manufacturers going direct on a global scale, cutting out all of the middlemen, and replacing local know-how with algorithms. It’s hard to imagine a company b…

Local managerial know-how of course; no one’s here talking about being able to automate out the skill of garment manufacture

…’s near-term future than Shein. Shein’s success is not built upon unfair government subsidies or stolen American IP—the compa…

This is way too important a claim to get this wrong.

Shipping, shipping, shipping, shipping, shipping. The subsidies were changed, but I’d love to know how comparable the rates are now: how much does it cost to get something from Guangzhou to Detroit relative to from Tampa to Detroit, and who is paying that difference.