abditory

(n.)
A concealed location used to hide things.

abligurition

(n.)
Ridiculous spending on food.

acedia

(n.)
Spiritual sloth, ennui.

acescent

(a.)
Turning sour.

acnestis

(n.)
The part of an animal that it cannot reach to scratch itself; typically between the shoulder blades. Sometimes given as restricted to quadrupeds.

adumbrate

(v. t.)
To give a faint shadow or slight representation of; to outline; to shadow forth. Metaphorically, to give a rough outline of, to explain at a high level.

adynaton

(n.)
Exaggeration (as in comparison) to an extent that makes impossibility clear (e.g. “It has a snowball’s chance in hell”).

aleatory

(a.)
Depending on chance, something that can’t be anticipated.

alleluiatic

(a.)
Pertaining to or consisting of an alleluia.

anneal

(v.t.)
To heat and cool in order to temper or toughen a material. Alternately to fire something to keep its color.

ambo

(n.) In Catholicism, the podium for readings and homilies. In the Eastern churches, some kind of platform.

azygous

(a.)
One, having no match, not one of a pair.

catachresis

(n.)
A figure by which one word is wrongly put for another, or by which a word is wrested from its true signification.

charrette

(n.)
An intense period of work, especially group work, especially to meet a deadline.

chatoyant

(a. (or noun if you mean the mineral))
Having a changeable, varying luster, or color, like that of a changeable silk, or of a cat’s eye in the dark.

dugnad

(n.) (eng. pl. dugnads, nor. pl. dugnader)
From Norwegian. Unpaid orchestrated group volunteer work. Often followed by a meal that may or may not be a potluck and thus a dugnad itself.

eft

(n.)
Old English efte, efeta “small lizard-like animal,” of unknown origin (see newt).

entelechy

(n.)
The complete realisation and final form of some potential concept or function; the conditions under which a potential thing becomes actualized. The thing which drives us towards our end. From telos and a “having” root, coined by Aristotle.

eustasy

(n.)
A worldwide change in sea level, especially one caused by melting ice or tectonic activity.

floccose

(a.)
Covered or growing in wooly tufts.

fulvous

(a.)
Tawny-coloured.

inspissate

(v.)
To thicken, as by boil; intransitively, to become viscous. (Inspissant: a thickening agent)

irrefragable

(a.)
Irrefutable, incontrovertible; of a person, stubborn.

liripipe

(n.)
The point of a hood extended into a long tail. Also a lesson committed to memory as “to learn one’s liripipe”.

luckenbooth

(n.)
A booth or shop that can be locked up, esp. with boards that fold into an overhang and counter.

(h/t)

palpebral

(a.) Of, relating to, or near the eyelids.

pauciloquy

(n.)
The use of few words when speaking. Laconism.

poliorcetics

(n. pl.) Siegecraft.

prasinous

(a.)
Leek-green.

proslepsis

(n.)
Pretending to pass over something while actually describing it completely.

reckful

(a.)
Cautious, attentive, careful. Cf. reckless.

spissitude

(n.)
Spiritual substance or density, as though extent in an extra dimension. Of a liquid, density or thickness.

synadelphic

(a.)
Acting together, as different members of an animal body.

synallagmatic

(a.)
Imposing reciprocal legal obligations upon the parties; bilateral.

synaxis

(n.)
An assembly, referring to specific feasts in the Eastern church.

synedrion

(n., pl. synedria)
An assembly that holds formal sessions.

synesis

(n.)
A grammatical construction in which a word takes the gender or number not of the word with which it should regularly agree, but of some other implied word, as in: “If the band are popular, they will play next month.” Alternatively, the faculty of good judgment or comprehension, passive intelligence.

syntomy

(n.)
brevity; conciseness

tmesis

(n.) Inserting a word inbetween the parts of another word (as in “absofuckinlutely”)

vair

(n.)
“squirrel fur,” or some other kind of fur in use in the Middle Ages, c. 1300, from Old French vair “two-toned squirrel fur; fur garments” (12c.), from Latin varium, masculine accusative singular of varius “parti-colored” (see vary). Gray or black above and white below.

verrucose

(a.) Warty

vesicant

(a.) Causing blisters of the skin